Changing the Number Format of a Merge Field in Mail Merge

Here are a few examples of different number formats
that you can use in the Mail Merge Master Template.

The Numeric format switch (\#) specifies the display of a number. Press Alt + F9 to display and edit the merge codes.

For example, if using the Master Template you would change the current field { MERGEFIELD Grant_Amount } which, by default, is formatted as $,0.00
and displayed as $10000.00 to { MERGEFIELD Grant_Amount \#
"$#,##0.00;($#,##0.00)" } the display would be $10,000.00.

Another example would be { MERGEFIELD Grant_Amount \# "#,##0;($#,##0)" } which would display as $10,000.

Below is an explanation of how you could create even more formats. This information can be accessed through the help link in Microsoft Word by entering "format fields" as the search criteria and then selecting "Insert and format field codes."

  • Note: Quotation marks are not required around simple numeric formats that do not
    include spaces — for example, { MarchSales \# $#,##0.00 }. For more complex numeric formats and those that include text or spaces, enclose the numeric format in quotation marks, as shown in the following examples. Word adds quotation marks to numeric format switches if you insert a field by using the Field dialog box or the Formula command in the Data group of the Layout tab (Table Toolscontextual
    tab).

Combine the following format items to build a numeric format switch:

  • 0 (zero) This format item specifies the requisite numeric places to display in the result. If the result does not include a digit in that place, Word displays a 0 (zero). For example, { = 4 + 5 \# 00.00 }displays 09.00.
  • # This format item specifies the requisite numeric places to display in the result. If the result does not include a digit in that place, Word displays a space. For example, { = 9 + 6 \# $### } displays $ 15.
  • x This format item drops digits to the left of the "x" placeholder. If the placeholder is to the right of the decimal point, Word rounds the result to that place. For example:
    { = 111053 + 111439 \# x## } displays 492.{ = 1/8 \# 0.00x } displays 0.125.{ = 3/4 \# .x } displays .8.
  • . (decimal point) This format item determines the decimal point position. For example, { = SUM(ABOVE) \# $###.00 } displays $495.47.

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